Circuitry and Sensory Substitution (A 2-Week Unit for Physics & Cambridge IGCSE Physics Courses)
Circuitry and Sensory Substitution (A 2-Week Unit for Physics & Cambridge IGCSE Physics Courses)
http://centerforneurotech.org/education-k-12-lesson-plans/circuitry-and-sensory-substitution

PostedWednesday, November 6, 2019 at 10:42 PM

Updated11/06/2019

In this 2-week, 4-lesson unit, students extend their knowledge of basic electric circuits by studying the function and use of complex components (e.g., thermistors, LDRs, logic gates, LEDs, etc.) in the context of a neural engineering design project. Students are introduced to basic neuroscience principles (e.g., the brain, neurons, motor cortex, brain-computer interfaces, etc.) and use these concepts to design, build, optimize, evaluate, and present a sensory-substitution device, modeled as an assistive device on circuit boards (the anchoring design problem). Some of the lessons in this unit feature special equipment, including an EMG gripper hand, Snap Circuit kits and components, circuitry components, and custom-designed circuit boards. These lessons were developed by Alexandra Pike, a National Board certified physics teacher at Juanita High School as part of the 2016-2018 Research Experience for Teachers program at the Center for Neurotechnology (University of Washington).

In this 2-week, 4-lesson unit, students extend their knowledge of basic electric circuits by studying the function and use of complex components (e.g., thermistors, LDRs, logic gates, LEDs, etc.) in the context of a neural engineering design project. Students are introduced to basic neuroscience principles (e.g., the brain, neurons, motor cortex, brain-computer interfaces, etc.) and use these concepts to design, build, optimize, evaluate, and present a sensory-substitution device, modeled as an assistive device on circuit boards (the anchoring design problem). Some of the lessons in this unit feature special equipment, including an EMG gripper hand, Snap Circuit kits and components, circuitry components, and custom-designed circuit boards. These lessons were developed by Alexandra Pike, a National Board certified physics teacher at Juanita High School as part of the 2016-2018 Research Experience for Teachers program at the Center for Neurotechnology (University of Washington).

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