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Design Practices and Misconceptions
Design Practices and Misconceptions

PostedTuesday, October 14, 2014 at 7:21 AM

Updated09/24/2017

This article describes beginner habits and misconceptions related to engineering design practices.

This article by David Crismond appeared in the January 2013 issue of The Science Teacher.

Once teachers are aware of these habits and misconceptions, they can more easily recognize them and work to remedy them through instruction. “The Informed Design Teaching and Learning  Matrix” provides more in-depth descriptions of the design practices, research on misconceptions, and teaching strategies for helping students become “informed designers” who can learn and use science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) ideas and practices while doing design challenges.

Including design among the short list of key practices that science teachers soon will be asked to address with students is challenging yet doable.  There is much  overlap between inquiry and design, and science teachers have seen design challenges in instructional materials before. Helping students to learn to design demands that teachers be aware of common starting points and preconceptions. By keeping habits of beginning designers in mind during instruction, teachers can sharpen their planning and interventions as they use more design activities in their science classes.

 

This article describes beginner habits and misconceptions related to engineering design practices.

This article by David Crismond appeared in the January 2013 issue of The Science Teacher.

Once teachers are aware of these habits and misconceptions, they can more easily recognize them and work to remedy them through instruction. “The Informed Design Teaching and Learning  Matrix” provides more in-depth descriptions of the design practices, research on misconceptions, and teaching strategies for helping students become “informed designers” who can learn and use science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) ideas and practices while doing design challenges.

Including design among the short list of key practices that science teachers soon will be asked to address with students is challenging yet doable.  There is much  overlap between inquiry and design, and science teachers have seen design challenges in instructional materials before. Helping students to learn to design demands that teachers be aware of common starting points and preconceptions. By keeping habits of beginning designers in mind during instruction, teachers can sharpen their planning and interventions as they use more design activities in their science classes.

 

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