TeachEngineering

Here, you can get a sense of how educators around the country are using TeachEngineering's 1,500+ instructional materials. The Share an Experience feature allows anyone who has downloaded and used a TeachEngineering resource to explain how they used or modified the resource, what worked and what was a challenge, and how useful it might be for other educators. 

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TeachEngineering Resources

aboutpage.jpgTeachEngineering (teachengineering.org) is a free, web-based digital library collection of hands-on K-12 engineering curricula created for educators to make science and math come alive through engineering design and habits of mind. With National Science Foundation (NSF) funding, the searchable TeachEngineering collection provides educators with access to more than 1,500 (and growing) curricular resources—including activities, lessons, units, “maker challenges,” “sprinkles” for informal learning settings and “living labs” that employ real-time data. The TeachEngineering curricula are externally reviewed and aligned with state, national and/or international science, mathematics and technology standards, and use engineering (increasingly focused on design) as the vehicle to integrate science and mathematics concepts for K-12 students.

The TeachEngineering digital library is a multi-university collaborative project led by the University of Colorado Boulder. The collection is comprised of classroom-tested curricular contributions from more than 50 engineering programs (mostly NSF-funded), including GK-12 and Research Experience for Teachers. The TeachEngineering digital library continues to grow and evolve with new curricular submissions and publications monthly, a cadre of volunteer teacher and engineer reviewers, and feedback from educators who use the curricula to engage youth in the creativity and integrative nature of engineering design.

Have you used a lesson from TeachEngineering.org? Share your experience with it by visiting teachengineering.org, browsing for the lesson you used, and clicking on the LinkEngineering Share An Experience box on that page.

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  • Partner Resource

    PostedJuly 8, 2017

    UpdatedJuly 14, 2017

    Posted By Teach Engineering

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7BUZUrD5Kg

    Students create their own anemometers—instruments for measuring wind speed. They see how an anemometer measures wind speed by taking measurements at various school locations. They also learn about different types of anemometers, real-world applications, and how wind speed information helps engineers decide where to place wind turbines.

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  • Partner Resource

    PostedJuly 8, 2017

    UpdatedJuly 14, 2017

    Posted By Teach Engineering

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m44uOtCuweI

    Students design and build paper rockets around film canisters, which serve as engines. An antacid tablet and water are put into each canister, reacting to form carbon dioxide gas, and acting as the pop rocket's propellant. With the lid snapped on, the continuous creation of gas causes pressure to build up until the lid pops off, sending the rocket into the air. The pop rockets demonstrate Newton's third law of motion: for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. An instructions handout, worksheets (English and Spanish) and quiz are provided.

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  • Partner Resource

    PostedJune 30, 2017

    UpdatedJuly 7, 2017

    Posted By Teach Engineering

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VNwBUa1qqI

    Light up your love with paper circuits this Valentine’s Day—no soldering required! Create a sure-to-impress flashing birthday card or design a light-up Christmas card—all with paper circuits! In this activity, students are guided through the process to create simple paper circuitry using only copper tape, a coin cell battery, a light-emitting diode (LED) and small electronic components such as a LilyPad Button Board. Making light-up greeting cards with paper circuitry is great way to teach the basics of how circuits function while giving students an outlet to express their artistic creativity.

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